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Seville:


When you arrive: taxis from the airport cost between 20 and 30 euros. There is a bus route from the airport which takes you into town for 4 euros. The centre of town sits just to the east of the river; Seville’s football stadium is east of town. Taxis, buses and an underground system are all available.


There are small bars pretty much everywhere you go in Seville, all offering similar menus. Tortillas (Spanish omelettes), patatas bravas, montaditos (little sandwiches) and fried seafood are offered pretty much everywhere (Sevillian food involves a lot of frying). For something local, there is an Andalucian cold soup dish called Salmorejo which is widely sold and can be delicious. The most common beer on tap in Seville is Cruzcampo. In most places, ordering a beer will get you only this. Some bars offer more of a range; to find more recognisable drinks, you’ll have to go to an English bar.


There are a few british pubs in Seville. The best by a distance is The Pheonix. Sitting just across the river near Los Remedios, The Pheonix has several screens which show football matches. You can get international beers not-too-expensively and the pub food and general atmosphere is good. The crowd is also fairly international. O’Neill’s is another English pub, located slightly nearer the centre. The drinks here are expensive, however, and the screens worse for watching football. The crowd is almost entirely English, however. The Clan is a Scottish pub, a little further from the river.


There’s a large open street called Alameda with a long run of bars and a couple of clubs that get busy in the evenings. A restaurant on the stretch called Alameda 5 does tasty, relatively inexpensive food – they do a delicious caramelised pork steak in curry sauce, but most of the menu is also high quality. They also get a lot of English diners there, so the staff and menus are both accommodating to non-Spanish-speaking clientele. Alameda 5 also have a large outside screen which is wheeled out for football matches, but typically shows Spanish fixtures.


There is a jazz bar called Naima Jazz Café which has good live music until midnight every night. Drinks are expensive but they do offer pints – most places don’t.


There’s a chain of fast food restaurants called 100 Montaditos which offers 100 different hot sandwich options and you can get large beers called ‘jarras’ (a bit less than a pint) for €1.50. Their hot dogs are particularly good value. There are three different 100 Montaditos around the city centre. The Good Burger also does high-quality fast food, and all burgers are two-for-one on Thursdays.


A bar called La Gitana Loca (“The Crazy Gypsy”) does incredibly cheap drinks – if you want to sit outside, a bar on Alameda called Amanacer also does cheap drinks. There is a run of bars in a part of town called Alfalfa which get quite busy in the evenings.


In terms of culture: there are a couple of art museums that are free to enter. There is a park with a fantastic building and courtyard called the Plaza de España which is beautiful and well worth seeing if the weather is good. The Real Alcazar – an old palace – is also amazing to look around, if you’re after some sight-seeing. The cathedral is similarly impressive, inside and out, and located right near the centre of the city. There is a bull ring which you can see but there aren’t any fights until April.


There’ll be a heightened police presence around the city around match day – obviously – remember to be a bit careful because the local police have been known to get quite violent.


Louis